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Springerplus. 2014 Dec 11;3:727. doi: 10.1186/2193-1801-3-727. eCollection 2014.

Family history of breast and ovarian cancer and triple negative subtype in hispanic/latina women.

Author information

1
Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, 3855 Health Sciences Dr., #0901, La Jolla, CA 92093-0901 USA.
2
University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ USA.
3
Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA USA.
4
Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ USA.
5
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX USA.
6
Universidad of Guadalajara, Guadalajara, México.
7
Instituto Tecnológico de Sonora, Ciudad Obregón, México.
8
Universidad of Sonora, Hermosillo, México.
9
University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX USA.
10
Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, 3855 Health Sciences Dr., #0901, La Jolla, CA 92093-0901 USA ; Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA USA.

Abstract

Familial breast and ovarian cancer prevalence was assessed among 1150 women of Mexican descent enrolled in a case-only, binational breast cancer study. Logistic regression was conducted to compare odds of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) to non-TNBC according to family history of breast and breast or ovarian cancer among 914 of these women. Prevalence of breast cancer family history in a first- and first- or second-degree relative was 13.1% and 24.1%, respectively; that for breast or ovarian cancer in a first-degree relative was 14.9%. After adjustment for age and country of residence, women with a first-degree relative with breast cancer were more likely to be diagnosed with TNBC than non-TNBC (OR=1.98; 95% CI, 1.26-3.11). The odds of TNBC compared to non-TNBC were 1.93 (95% CI, 1.26-2.97) for women with a first-degree relative with breast or ovarian cancer. There were non-significant stronger associations between family history and TNBC among women diagnosed at age <50 compared to ≥50 years for breast cancer in a first-degree relative (P-interaction = 0.14) and a first- or second-degree relative (P-interaction = 0.07). Findings suggest that familial breast cancers are associated with triple negative subtype, possibly related to BRCA mutations in Hispanic/Latina women, which are strongly associated with TNBC. Family history is an important tool to identify Hispanic/Latina women who may be at increased risk of TNBC, and could benefit from prevention and early detection strategies.

KEYWORDS:

Family history; Hispanic; Risk factor heterogeneity; Triple negative breast cancer

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