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Am J Cardiol. 2015 Apr 15;115(8):1151-3. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.01.552. Epub 2015 Feb 3.

Current and future status of adult congenital training in North America.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, The Adult Congenital Heart Disease Center, Heart Institute Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
2
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
3
Department of Cardiology, The Columbus Ohio Adult Congenital Heart (COACH) Program, Columbus, Ohio.
4
Department of Cardiology, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
5
Department of Cardiology, The Adult Congenital Heart Disease Center, Heart Institute Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: stephen.cook@chp.edu.

Abstract

Adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) presents a unique and growing patient population, but there are no data to suggest there are sufficient training programs available to train specialists to meet the needs of this population. The objective of this national survey was to determine the current status of ACHD fellowship curricula and training. An online questionnaire was provided to adult and pediatric cardiology fellowship programs to determine program demographics, status, duration, faculty teaching responsibilities, volume or patient exposure, and institutional obstacles. Of the 225 programs surveyed, 81 responded (36%). Nearly all were university affiliated (93%) with <1/3 (29%) reporting an ACHD fellowship program. Most offered either a 1- (42%) or a 2-year (47%) fellowship. ACHD fellowship funding was provided by hospital budget (68%). Half reported an increase in applicants to their fellowship. Applicants were more likely to have had previous training in adult cardiovascular medicine (56%). Respondents ranked "Volume of Outpatients/Year" and "Lack of Institutional Support" as the most important aspect of an ACHD program to applicants and greatest obstacle to ACHD training, respectively. After training, ACHD fellows obtained adult cardiology/ACHD positions (47%) and were within an academic center (88%). In conclusion, the results demonstrate a deficiency in the number of currently available ACHD fellowship programs. Measures should be taken to strengthen and standardize ACHD training to meet the increasing workforce requirements of this population.

PMID:
25711436
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjcard.2015.01.552
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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