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Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2015 May;115:203-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2015.02.018. Epub 2015 Feb 20.

Impact of wastewater from different sources on the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli in sewage treatment plants in South India.

Author information

1
Bacterial and Parasitic Disease Research Division, National Institute of Animal Health, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan; Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Izumisano, Osaka, Japan. Electronic address: akiba@affrc.go.jp.
2
Animal Inspection Division, Quarantine Department, Animal Quarantine Service, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan.
3
Tobu Livestock Hygiene Service Center, Fuefuki, Yamanashi, Japan.
4
Department of Civil Engineering, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka, India.
5
National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
6
Bacterial and Parasitic Disease Research Division, National Institute of Animal Health, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
7
Viral Diseases and Epidemiology Research Division, National Institute of Animal Health, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
8
Department of Microbiology, Melaka Manipal Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka, India.
9
Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Health Sciences, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, NY, USA.
10
Pathology and Pathophysiology Research Division, National Institute of Animal Health, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan. Electronic address: guruge@affrc.go.jp.

Abstract

The sewage treatment plant (STP) is one of the most important interfaces between the human population and the aquatic environment, leading to contamination of the latter by antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. To identify factors affecting the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria, water samples were collected from three different STPs in South India. STP1 exclusively treats sewage generated by a domestic population. STP2 predominantly treats sewage generated by a domestic population with a mix of hospital effluent. STP3 treats effluents generated exclusively by a hospital. The water samples were collected between three intermediate treatment steps including equalization, aeration, and clarification, in addition to the outlet to assess the removal rates of bacteria as the effluent passed through the treatment plant. The samples were collected in three different seasons to study the effect of seasonal variation. Escherichia coli isolated from the water samples were tested for susceptibility to 12 antimicrobials. The results of logistic regression analysis suggest that the hospital wastewater inflow significantly increased the prevalence of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli, whereas the treatment processes and sampling seasons did not affect the prevalence of these isolates. A bias in the genotype distribution of E. coli was observed among the isolates obtained from STP3. In conclusion, hospital wastewaters should be carefully treated to prevent the contamination of Indian environment with antimicrobial-resistant bacteria.

KEYWORDS:

Antimicrobial resistance; E coli; Environmental contamination; Hospital effluent; India; Sewage treatment plant

PMID:
25704279
DOI:
10.1016/j.ecoenv.2015.02.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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