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Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2015 May;52:21-37. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2015.02.007. Epub 2015 Feb 19.

Neural bases of prospective memory: a meta-analysis and the "Attention to Delayed Intention" (AtoDI) model.

Author information

1
Department of General Psychology, University of Padua, Via Venezia 8, 35131 Padua, Italy. Electronic address: giorgia.cona@unipd.it.
2
Department of Psychosis Studies, King's College Health Partners, King's College London, De Crespigny Park, SE5 8AF London, UK. Electronic address: cristina.scarpazza@gmail.com.
3
Department of General Psychology, University of Padua, Via Venezia 8, 35131 Padua, Italy; Department of General Psychology, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. Electronic address: giuseppe.sartori@unipd.it.
4
Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3G3, Canada; Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre, 3560 Bathurst Street, Toronto M6A 2E1, Canada. Electronic address: momos@psych.utoronto.ca.
5
Department of General Psychology, University of Padua, Via Venezia 8, 35131 Padua, Italy; Department of General Psychology, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. Electronic address: patrizia.bisiacchi@unipd.it.

Abstract

Remembering to realize delayed intentions is a multi-phase process, labelled as prospective memory (PM), and involves a plurality of neural networks. The present study utilized the activation likelihood estimation method of meta-analysis to provide a complete overview of the brain regions that are consistently activated in each PM phase. We formulated the 'Attention to Delayed Intention' (AtoDI) model to explain the neural dissociation found between intention maintenance and retrieval phases. The dorsal frontoparietal network is involved mainly in the maintenance phase and seems to mediate the strategic monitoring processes, such as the allocation of top-down attention both towards external stimuli, to monitor for the occurrence of the PM cues, and to internal memory contents, to maintain the intention active in memory. The ventral frontoparietal network is recruited in the retrieval phase and might subserve the bottom-up attention captured externally by the PM cues and, internally, by the intention stored in memory. Together with other brain regions (i.e., insula and posterior cingulate cortex), the ventral frontoparietal network would support the spontaneous retrieval processes. The functional contribution of the anterior prefrontal cortex is discussed extensively for each PM phase.

KEYWORDS:

Activation likelihood estimation; Anterior cingulate cortex; Anterior prefrontal cortex; AtoDI; AtoM; Attention to Delayed Intention model; BA10; Bottom-up attention; DLPFC; Delayed intention; Frontoparietal network; Gateway Hypothesis; Insula; Meta-analysis; Multiprocess framework; Neuroimaging; Parietal cortex; Posterior cingulate cortex; Prospective memory; Spontaneous retrieval; Strategic monitoring; Top-down attention

PMID:
25704073
DOI:
10.1016/j.neubiorev.2015.02.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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