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J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2015 Feb;25(2):95-9. doi: 02.2015/JCPSP.9599.

Clinical, laboratory and bacterial profile of Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis in Chronic Liver Disease patients.

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1
PMRC Specialized Centre of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the clinical and laboratory features, bacterial profile and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis (SBP) in Chronic Liver Disease (CLD) patients presenting at a tertiary care hospital of Karachi.

STUDY DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study.

PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY:

PMRC Centre for Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from April 2010 to March 2012.

METHODOLOGY:

CLD patients with ascites were recruited from PMRC Centre for Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi. Basic demographics, symptoms and clinical signs of patients were recorded. Patients with the history of antibiotic use within last 3 days or any intra-abdominal source of infection were excluded. Diagnostic paracentesis was done for ascitic fluid detailed report (D/R) and culture. Blood sample was collected for total leukocyte count, serum proteins and billirubin levels.

RESULTS:

Out of a total 152 CLD patients, 38 (25%) were diagnosed with SBP. Eight (24.2%) patients presented with classical SBP, 20 (52.6%) had culture negative neutrocytic ascites and 10 (26%) had bacterascites. Fever, abdominal tenderness and constipation were common in SBP patients. Ascitic fluid culture was positive in 19 (50%) patients. E. coli (65%) was the predominant pathogen followed by Enterococcus species (15%). Resistance was high against cephalosporins (78%) and fluoroquinolones (69.6%) and least against amikacin (13%) and meropenem (12%).

CONCLUSION:

Ascitic fluid D/R and culture together can lead to the accurate diagnosis of SBP and can guide for the right antibiotic choice as resistance to commonly prescribed antibiotic is common in such patients.

PMID:
25703750
DOI:
02.2015/JCPSP.9599
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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