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Neurosci Lett. 2015 Mar 30;591:155-9. doi: 10.1016/j.neulet.2015.02.037. Epub 2015 Feb 19.

Near infrared light mitigates cerebellar pathology in transgenic mouse models of dementia.

Author information

1
Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia; Discipline of Physiology, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia; Save Sight Institute & Clinical Ophthalmology, University of Sydney & Sydney Eye Hospital, NSW 2000, Australia.
2
Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia; Discipline of Physiology, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. Electronic address: Daniel.Johnstone@sydney.edu.au.
3
Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia; Discipline of Physiology, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.
4
Dementia Research Unit, School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052, Australia.
5
Dementia Research Unit, School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052, Australia; Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, NSW 2031, Australia.
6
Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia; Discipline of Anatomy & Histology, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

Abstract

We previously reported that Alzheimer-related pathology in cerebral cortex of APP/PS1 and K3 tau transgenic mouse strains is mitigated by near infrared light (NIr). Here, we extend these observations to the cerebellum. One month of NIr treatment mitigated the deposition of β-amyloid in cerebellar cortex of APP/PS1 mice, and the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, the hyperphosphorylation of tau, the damage caused by oxidative stress and the downregulation of cytochrome oxidase expression by Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex of K3 mice. These findings show the ability of NIr to mitigate degeneration in many - probably all - regions of the mouse brain.

KEYWORDS:

Dementia; Mouse model; Near infrared light; Neuroprotection

PMID:
25703226
DOI:
10.1016/j.neulet.2015.02.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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