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Nutrition. 2015 Mar;31(3):531-4. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2014.09.013. Epub 2014 Oct 18.

Effects of a single dose of a flavonoid-rich blueberry drink on memory in 8 to 10 y old children.

Author information

1
School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading, Earley Gate, Whiteknights, Reading, United Kingdom.
2
School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading, Earley Gate, Whiteknights, Reading, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Claire.williams@reading.ac.uk.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Recent evidence from animals and adult humans has demonstrated potential benefits to cognition from flavonoid supplementation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these cognitive benefits extended to a sample of school-aged children.

METHOD:

Using a crossover design, with a washout of at least 7 d between drinks, 14 children ages 8 to 10 y consumed either a flavonoid-rich blueberry drink or a matched vehicle. Two h after consumption, the children completed a battery of five cognitive tests comprising the Go-NoGo, Stroop, Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Task, Object Location Task, and a Visual N-back.

RESULTS:

In comparison to the vehicle, the blueberry drink produced significant improvements in the delayed recall of a previously learned list of words, showing for the first time a cognitive benefit for acute flavonoid intervention in children. However, performance on a measure of proactive interference indicated that the blueberry intervention led to a greater negative impact of previously memorized words on the encoding of a set of new words. There was no benefit of our blueberry intervention for measures of attention, response inhibition, or visuospatial memory.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although findings are mixed, the improvements in delayed recall found in this pilot study suggest that, following acute flavonoid-rich blueberry interventions, school-aged children encode memory items more effectively.

KEYWORDS:

Anthocyanin; Attention; Blueberry; Children; Cognitive; Flavonoid; Memory

PMID:
25701345
DOI:
10.1016/j.nut.2014.09.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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