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J Neurosci. 2015 Feb 18;35(7):3240-7. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2092-14.2015.

Brain amyloid-β burden is associated with disruption of intrinsic functional connectivity within the medial temporal lobe in cognitively normal elderly.

Author information

1
Center for Vital Longevity, University of Texas at Dallas, Dallas, Texas 75235, Northern California Institute of Research and Education, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California 94121, and Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging.
2
Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging.
3
Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Department of Neurology, and.
4
Department of Neurology, and.
5
Northern California Institute of Research and Education, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California 94121, and Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Department of Neurology, and Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 Michael.Weiner@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

The medial temporal lobe is implicated as a key brain region involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and consequent memory loss. Tau tangle aggregation in this region may develop concurrently with cortical Aβ deposition in preclinical AD, but the pathological relationship between tau and Aβ remains unclear. We used task-free fMRI with a focus on the medical temporal lobe, together with Aβ PET imaging, in cognitively normal elderly human participants. We found that cortical Aβ load was related to disrupted intrinsic functional connectivity of the perirhinal cortex, which is typically the first brain region affected by tauopathies in AD. There was no concurrent association of cortical Aβ load with cognitive performance or brain atrophy. These findings suggest that dysfunction in the medial temporal lobe may represent a very early sign of preclinical AD and may predict future memory loss.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; amyloid; hippocampus; perirhinal cortex

PMID:
25698758
PMCID:
PMC4331637
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2092-14.2015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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