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Int J Infect Dis. 2015 Apr;33:219-21. doi: 10.1016/j.ijid.2015.02.009. Epub 2015 Feb 17.

High risk human papillomavirus persistence among HIV-infected young women in South Africa.

Author information

1
601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 655, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 14534 USA. Electronic address: david_adler@urmc.rochester.edu.
2
Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute of Infectious Diseases & Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa. Electronic address: Melissa.Wallace@hiv-research.org.za.
3
Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute of Infectious Diseases & Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa. Electronic address: Thola.Bennie@hiv-research.org.za.
4
601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 655, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 14534 USA. Electronic address: beau_abar@urmc.rochester.edu.
5
601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 655, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 14534 USA. Electronic address: rokhsanna_sadeghi@urmc.rochester.edu.
6
Institute of Infectious Diseases & Molecular Medicine and Division of Medical Virology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa. Electronic address: tracy.meiring@gmail.com.
7
Institute of Infectious Diseases & Molecular Medicine and Division of Medical Virology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa. Electronic address: anna-lise.williamson@uct.ac.za.
8
Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute of Infectious Diseases & Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa. Electronic address: linda-gail.bekker@hiv-research.org.za.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Persistence of infection with high-risk Human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) increases the risk of incident and progressive precancerous lesions of the cervix. Rates of HR-HPV persistence have been shown to be increased among HIV-infected adult women, however there is a paucity of literature addressing HPV persistence in the young HIV-infected population. We compared rates of HR-HPV persistence between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected young women.

METHODS:

We obtained self-collected vaginal swabs at six-month intervals from 50 HIV-uninfected and 33 HIV-infected young women recruited through a community youth center (age 17-21 years) and compared rates of HR-HPV persistence. HR-HPV testing was conducted using the Roche's Linear Array® HPV Test.

RESULTS:

Eighty-three prevalent (upon baseline testing) and incident (upon subsequent testing) individual HR-HPV infections were identified among 43 members of the cohort (23 HIV-uninfected and 20 HIV-infected). At twelve months, 19% of baseline HR-HPV infections continued to be present with a statistically significant difference between HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected participants (4% versus 31%; p=0.01).

CONCLUSIONS:

HIV-infected young women in our cohort had a seven-fold increased rate of persistence of HR-HPV overall at 12 months, indicating an increased risk for incident and progressive precancerous lesions. Identification of persistent infection with HR-HPV may complement cytological findings in determining the need for colposcopy.

KEYWORDS:

HIV; Human papillomavirus; South Africa; persistence

PMID:
25697074
PMCID:
PMC4397173
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijid.2015.02.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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