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Acta Neuropsychiatr. 2015 Jun;27(3):189-94. doi: 10.1017/neu.2015.4. Epub 2015 Feb 20.

Chronic lipopolysaccharide infusion fails to induce depressive-like behaviour in adult male rats.

Author information

1
1Translational Neuropsychiatry Unit,Aarhus University,Risskov,Denmark.
2
2The National Research Centre for the Working Environment,Copenhagen,Denmark.
3
3Medical Research Laboratory,Medical Department M (Endocrinology and Diabetes),Aarhus University Hospital,Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Chronic inflammation is implicated in numerous diseases, including major depression and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Since depression and T2DM often co-exist, inflammatory pathways are suggested as a possible link. Hence, the establishment of an immune-mediated animal model would shed light on mechanisms possibly linking depression and metabolic alterations.

OBJECTIVE:

In this study we investigated a behavioural and metabolic paradigm following chronic infusion with low doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using osmotic minipumps in male rats.

METHODS:

Behavioural testing consisted of evaluating activity level in the open field and depressive-like behaviour in the forced swim test. Metabolic assessment included measurement of body weight, food and water intake, and glucose and insulin levels during an oral glucose tolerance test.

RESULTS:

LPS-infused rats showed acute signs of sickness behaviour, but chronic LPS infusion did not induce behavioural or metabolic changes.

CONCLUSION:

These results suggest that although inflammation is immediately induced as indicated by acute sickness, 4 weeks of chronic LPS administration via osmotic minipumps did not result in behavioural changes. Therefore, this paradigm may not be a suitable model for studying the underlying mechanisms that link depression and T2DM.

KEYWORDS:

central nervous system; depression; neuroendocrinology; psychoneuroimmunology

PMID:
25697068
DOI:
10.1017/neu.2015.4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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