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Neuron. 2015 Feb 18;85(4):669-82. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2015.01.009.

Lysophosphatidic Acid signaling in the nervous system.

Author information

1
Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience Department, Dorris Neuroscience Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
2
Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience Department, Dorris Neuroscience Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
3
Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience Department, Dorris Neuroscience Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Electronic address: jchun@scripps.edu.

Erratum in

  • Neuron. 2015 Apr 8;86(1):341.

Abstract

The brain is composed of many lipids with varied forms that serve not only as structural components but also as essential signaling molecules. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is an important bioactive lipid species that is part of the lysophospholipid (LP) family. LPA is primarily derived from membrane phospholipids and signals through six cognate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), LPA1-6. These receptors are expressed on most cell types within central and peripheral nervous tissues and have been functionally linked to many neural processes and pathways. This Review covers a current understanding of LPA signaling in the nervous system, with particular focus on the relevance of LPA to both physiological and diseased states.

PMID:
25695267
PMCID:
PMC4400838
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2015.01.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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