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Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2015 Dec;26(8):789-96. doi: 10.1111/pai.12352. Epub 2015 May 12.

Food consumption and risk of childhood asthma.

Author information

1
Nutrition Unit, Department of Lifestyle and Participation, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
2
School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
3
Children's Hospital, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
4
Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.
6
Allergy & Respiratory Research Group, Centre for Population Health Sciences, The University Of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
7
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Research Unit, Seinäjoki Central Hospital and University of Tampere, Seinäjoki, Finland.
8
Center for Laboratory Medicine, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland.
9
Immunogenetics Laboratory, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
10
Department of Clinical Microbiology, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
11
Department of Pediatrics, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
12
Folkhälsan Research Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
13
Diabetes and Obesity Research Program, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
14
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
15
Research Center for Child Health and Science Centre of Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere University Hospital and University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The consumption of foods rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids has been proposed to protect against childhood asthma. This study explores the association of food consumption (including cow's milk (CM)-free diet) in early life and the risk of atopic and non-atopic asthma.

METHODS:

Food intake of 182 children with asthma and 728 matched controls was measured using 3-day food records, within the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) Nutrition Study cohort. The diagnoses of food allergies came both from the written questionnaire and from the registers of the Social Insurance Institution. Conditional logistic regression with generalized estimating equations framework was used in the analyses.

RESULTS:

The diagnosis of cow's milk allergy (CMA) led to multiple dietary restrictions still evident at 4 yr of age. Even after adjusting for CMA, higher consumption of CM products was inversely associated with the risk of atopic asthma and higher consumption of breast milk and oats inversely with the risk of non-atopic asthma. Early consumption of fish was associated with a decreased risk of all asthma.

CONCLUSIONS:

Dietary intake in early life combined with atopy history has a clear impact on the risk of developing asthma. Our results indicate that CM restriction due to CMA significantly increases and mediates the association between food consumption and childhood asthma risk.

KEYWORDS:

asthma; atopy; cow's milk allergy; diet

PMID:
25693000
DOI:
10.1111/pai.12352
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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