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J Am Coll Health. 2015;63(4):238-47. doi: 10.1080/07448481.2015.1015029. Epub 2015 Feb 18.

A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of the Acceptability and Effectiveness of University Smoke-Free Policies.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Systematically review studies of support for, and effectiveness of, university campuses' smoke-free policies.

PARTICIPANTS/METHODS:

A search was carried out for studies in English related to campus smoking bans through June 2013. Eligible studies had outcomes for student or faculty attitudes, or measures of smoking prevalence or secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure.

RESULTS:

Nineteen eligible studies were identified, 18 from the United States and 1 from the United Kingdom. A meta-analysis found 58.94% (95% confidence interval [CI] [52.35%, 65.53%]) of students (12 studies) and 68.39% (95% CI [65.12%, 71.67%]) of faculty (7 studies) supported smoke-free policies. Both studies measuring student smoking prevalence indicated a postban reduction (16.5% to 12.8% after 1 year [p < .001] and 9.5% to 7.0% [p = .036] after 3 years). Only 5% of UK universities were smoke-free compared with 25% of US universities.

CONCLUSIONS:

A majority of students and faculty support smoke-free campus policies, which may reduce smoking and SHS exposure.

KEYWORDS:

attitudes; effectiveness; smoke-free campus

PMID:
25692536
DOI:
10.1080/07448481.2015.1015029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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