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Neurosurgery. 2015 Mar;76 Suppl 1:S4-13; discussion S13. doi: 10.1227/01.neu.0000462073.71915.12.

Impact of tumor histology on resectability and neurological outcome in primary intramedullary spinal cord tumors: a single-center experience with 102 patients.

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1
*Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina; †Rho Inc., Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Surgical outcomes for intramedullary spinal cord tumors are affected by many variables including tumor histology and preoperative neurological function.

OBJECTIVE:

To analyze the impact of tumor histology on neurological outcome in primary intramedullary spinal cord tumors.

METHODS:

A retrospective review of 102 consecutive patients with intramedullary spinal cord tumors treated at a single institution between January 1998 and March 2009.

RESULTS:

Ependymomas were the most common tumors with 55 (53.9%), followed by 21 astrocytomas (20.6%), 12 hemangioblastomas (11.8%), and 14 miscellaneous tumors (13.7%). Gross total resection was achieved in 50 ependymomas (90.9%), 3 astrocytomas (14.3%), 11 hemangioblastomas (91.7%), and 12 miscellaneous tumors (85.7%). At a mean follow-up of 41.8 months (range, 1-132 months), we observed recurrences in 4 ependymoma cases (7.3%), 10 astrocytoma cases (47.6%), 1 miscellaneous tumor case (7.1%), and no recurrence in hemangioblastoma cases. When analyzed by tumor location, there was no difference in neurological outcomes (P = .66). At the time of their last follow-up visit, 11 patients (20%) with an ependymoma improved, 38 (69%) remained the same, and 6 (10.9%) worsened. In patients with an astrocytoma, 1 (4.8%) improved, 10 (47.6%) remained the same, and 10 (47.6%) worsened. One patient (8.3%) with a hemangioblastoma improved and 11 (91.7%) remained the same. No patient with a hemangioblastoma worsened. In the miscellaneous tumor group, 2 (14.3%) improved, 10 (71.4%) remained the same, and 2 (14.3%) worsened. Preoperative neurological status (P = .02), tumor histology (P = .005), and extent of resection (P < .0001) were all predictive of functional neurological outcomes.

CONCLUSION:

Tumor histology is the most important predictor of neurological outcome after surgical resection because it predicts resectability and recurrence.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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