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Ann Behav Med. 2015 Aug;49(4):579-93. doi: 10.1007/s12160-015-9689-0.

Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioural Self-Help for the Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in People with Long-Term Physical Health Conditions: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials.

Author information

1
Clinical Education, Development and Research (CEDAR), Psychology, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK, p.a.farrand@exeter.ac.uk.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Depression and anxiety are prevalent comorbidities in people with long-term physical health conditions; however, there is limited access to evidence-based treatments for comorbid mental health difficulties.

PURPOSE:

This study is a meta-analysis examining the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural self-help for physical symptoms, depression and anxiety in people with long-term conditions.

METHODS:

This study involves a systematic search of electronic databases supplemented by expert contact, reference and citation checking and grey literature.

RESULTS:

The meta-analysis yielded a small effect size for 11 studies reporting primary outcomes of depression (g = -0.20) and 8 studies anxiety (g = -0.21) with a large effect size (g = -1.14) for 1 study examining physical health symptoms. There were no significant moderators of the main effect.

CONCLUSIONS:

Limited evidence supports cognitive behavioural self-help for depression, anxiety and physical symptoms in people with long-term conditions. Small effect sizes for depression and anxiety may result from failure to recruit participants with clinical levels of these difficulties at baseline.

PMID:
25690370
DOI:
10.1007/s12160-015-9689-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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