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Nat Rev Cancer. 2014 May;14(5):291-2. doi: 10.1038/nrc3723.

Mining the genomes of exceptional responders.

Author information

1
Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garsube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden Glasgow, Scotland G61 1BD, UK; The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 364 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia.
2
Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Insitute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow, Scotland G61 1BD, UK; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia, 4067 Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
3
Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow, Scotland G61 1BD, UK.
4
Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Insitute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow, Scotland G61 1BD, UK; The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 364 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk

Abstract

The National Cancer Institute of the United States recently announced a major new initiative in understanding the genomes or, more broadly, the molecular phenotypes of exceptional responders. What can we expect to learn from exceptional responders? What are the potential benefits, and how do we approach studying them?

PMID:
25688402
DOI:
10.1038/nrc3723
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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