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Europace. 2015 May;17(5):761-6. doi: 10.1093/europace/euu377. Epub 2015 Feb 16.

Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with a subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Homolka Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic Department of Neurology, Third faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague.
2
Department of Cardiology, Homolka Hospital (Na Homolce Hospital), Prague, Roentgenova 2, Praha 5, 150 30 Prague, Czech Republic petr.neuzil@gmail.com.
3
Department of Radiology, Homolka Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic.
4
Department of Cardiology, Homolka Hospital (Na Homolce Hospital), Prague, Roentgenova 2, Praha 5, 150 30 Prague, Czech Republic.
5
Department of Cardiology, Homolka Hospital (Na Homolce Hospital), Prague, Roentgenova 2, Praha 5, 150 30 Prague, Czech Republic Cardiac Arrhythmia Service, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York City, NY, USA.

Abstract

AIMS:

Our aim was to evaluate the potential for safely imaging patients with a new type of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator called the subcutaneous implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (S-ICD) in a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. With the increasing number of patients with cardiac implantable devices who are indicated for MRI, there is a growing need for establishing MRI compatibility of cardiac implantable devices.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Patients with implanted S-ICD systems underwent one or more types of anatomical MRI scans. The S-ICD was programmed off and patients were monitored throughout the imaging procedure. Device function was evaluated pre- and post-scan. Patients were asked to report immediately any pain, torqueing movement, or heating sensation in the area of the pocket or electrode. Fifteen patients underwent a total of 22 examinations at 1.5 T. Scans included brain, spine, knee, and heart. Two patients were re-scanned due to complaints of heating over the can during lumbar scans, which was caused by a thermistor probe placed on the skin to measure skin temperature. All the remaining scans occurred without incident. No evidence of device malfunction was observed.

CONCLUSION:

This study is the first to domonstrate the feasibility of exposing S-ICD patients to MRI using the scanning and monitoring protocol described. More data are required to support S-ICD as a MRI conditional device.

KEYWORDS:

Implantable defibrillator; Magnetic resonance imaging; Subcutaneous S-ICD

PMID:
25687749
PMCID:
PMC4413883
DOI:
10.1093/europace/euu377
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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