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Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2015 Apr;95:47-55. doi: 10.1016/j.plefa.2015.01.001. Epub 2015 Jan 19.

The effect of modifying dietary LA and ALA intakes on omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 LCPUFA) status in human adults: a systematic review and commentary.

Author information

1
FOODplus Research Centre, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5064, Australia.
2
School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia.
3
Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
4
FOODplus Research Centre, School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5064, Australia. Electronic address: beverly.muhlhausler@adelaide.edu.au.

Abstract

This paper presents a systematic review of human studies investigating the effect of altering dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-3 PUFA) alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6 PUFA) linoleic acid (LA) intakes on n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) status in adult humans. The results suggest that it is possible to increase n-3 LCPUFA status by reducing LA and/or increasing ALA intake in humans, although decreasing LA intake to below 2.5%E may be required to specifically increase levels of the n-3 LCPUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). The majority of studies in this area to date have been relatively poor in quality, which limits the ability to draw robust conclusions, and we present a series of recommendations to improve the quality of future studies in fatty acid nutrition in humans.

KEYWORDS:

ALA; DHA; Diet; EPA; Human; LA

PMID:
25687496
DOI:
10.1016/j.plefa.2015.01.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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