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Food Chem. 2012 Jul 15;133(2):337-43. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2012.01.037. Epub 2012 Jan 28.

Protective effect of extracts of Perilla frutescens treated with sucrose on tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative hepatotoxicity in vitro and in vivo.

Author information

1
Division of Food Bioscience and Technology, College of Life Science & Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713, South Korea.
2
Division of Life and Genetic Engineering, College of Life Science & Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713, South Korea.
3
Miryang City Agricultural Technology Center, Miryang-si, Gyeongsangnam-do 627-911, South Korea.
4
Nutraceutical & Functional Food Center, CJ CheilJedang Co., Seoul 152-051, South Korea.
5
Division of Food Bioscience and Technology, College of Life Science & Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713, South Korea. Electronic address: kwangwon@korea.ac.kr.

Abstract

Perilla frutescens leaves are often used in East Asian gourmet food. In this study, we investigated the hepatoprotective effects of P. frutescens leaves grown in different concentrations of sucrose (0, 115, 175 and 235 mM sucrose) leading to four samples of perilla leaf extracts (PLEs). Based on caffeic acid level and antioxidant activities, further experiments were conducted using perilla leaf extracts treated with 6% sucrose compared with non-treated perilla leaf extracts as a control. Oral intubation with non-treated perilla leaf extracts or perilla leaf extracts treated with 6% sucrose (1000 mg/kg b.w. rat) for 5 days was conducted before treatment with a single dose of tert-butyl hydroperoxide (0.5 mmol/kg b.w., i.p.) led to a significant reduction of hepatic toxicity in the perilla leaf extracts treated with 6% sucrose. We demonstrated that P. frutescens with higher contents of caffeic acid was produced, and that sucrose could play a role in the induction of this secondary metabolite. Sucrose-treated perilla leaves, which had better antioxidant activities than untreated leaves, can be used as a potential dietary source.

KEYWORDS:

Caffeic acid; Hepatotoxicity; Oxidative stress; Perilla frutescens; Sucrose

PMID:
25683404
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2012.01.037
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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