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Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2015 Oct;83(4):498-507. doi: 10.1111/cen.12747. Epub 2015 Mar 6.

Metabolic and hormonal effects of 'catch-up' sleep in men with chronic, repetitive, lifestyle-driven sleep restriction.

Author information

1
NHMRC Centre for Integrated Research and Understanding of Sleep, Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
2
Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
3
Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Torrance, CA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Acutely restricting sleep worsens insulin sensitivity in healthy individuals whose usual sleep is normal in duration and pattern. The effect of recovery or weekend 'catch-up' sleep on insulin sensitivity and metabolically active hormones in individuals with chronic sleep restriction who regularly 'catch-up' on sleep at weekends is as yet unstudied.

DESIGN:

19 men (mean ± SEM age 28·6 ± 2·0 years, BMI 26·0 ± 0·8 kg/m(2) ) with at least 6 months' history (5·1 ± 0·9 years) of lifestyle-driven, restricted sleep during the working week (373 ± 6·6 min/night) with regular weekend 'catch-up' sleep (weekend sleep extension 37·4 ± 2·3%) completed an in-laboratory, randomized, crossover study comprising two of three conditions, stratified by age. Conditions were 3 weekend nights of 10 hours, 6 hours or 10 hours time-in-bed with slow wave sleep (SWS) suppression using targeted acoustic stimuli.

MEASUREMENTS:

Insulin sensitivity was measured in the morning following the 3rd intervention night by minimal modelling of 19 samples collected during a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test. Glucose, insulin, c-peptide, leptin, peptide YY (PYY), ghrelin, cortisol, testosterone and luteinizing hormone (LH) were measured from daily fasting blood samples; HOMA-IR, HOMA-β and QUICKI were calculated.

RESULTS:

Insulin sensitivity was higher following three nights of sleep extension compared to sustained sleep restriction. Fasting insulin, c-peptide, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β, leptin and PYY decreased with 'catch-up' sleep, QUICKI and testosterone increased, while morning cortisol and LH did not change. Targeted acoustic stimuli reduced SWS by 23%, but did not alter insulin sensitivity.

CONCLUSIONS:

Three nights of 'catch-up' sleep improved insulin sensitivity in men with chronic, repetitive sleep restriction. Methods to improve metabolic health by optimizing sleep are plausible.

PMID:
25683266
PMCID:
PMC4858168
DOI:
10.1111/cen.12747
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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