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Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2015 Mar 20;458(4):733-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2015.01.089. Epub 2015 Feb 12.

Expression of bitter taste receptor Tas2r105 in mouse kidney.

Author information

1
School of Life Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai, 200469, People's Republic of China.
2
School of Life Sciences, Shanghai University, Shanghai, 200469, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: chenfuxue@staff.shu.edu.cn.
3
School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, S 280 Chongqing RD, Shanghai, 200092, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: lifeng@shsmu.edu.cn.

Abstract

The kidney is the most important excretory organ in the body and plays an essential role in maintaining homeostasis in vivo by conserving body fluid and electrolytes and removing metabolic waste. In this study, three types of transgenic system were used to investigate the expression of the bitter taste receptor Tas2r105 in mouse renal tissue (Tas2r105-GFP/Cre, Tas2r105-GFP/Cre-DTA and Tas2r105-GFP/Cre-LacZ). The results suggest that bitter taste receptors Tas2r105 and Tas2r106 are expressed in the renal corpuscle and the renal tubule, including the proximal tubule and distal tubule. Expression of α-gustducin, an important component of taste signal transduction, was also detected in mouse kidney. Meanwhile, conditional diphtheria toxin (DTA) expression in Tas2r105+ cells caused an increase in size of the glomerulus and renal tubule, accompanied by a decrease in cell density in the glomerulus. This indicates that Tas2r105+ cells play an important role in maintaining the structure of the glomerulus and renal tubules. Overall, the current study collectively demonstrates that cells labeled by bitter taste receptor expression may play a critical role in controlling human health, and have properties far beyond the original concept of taste perception.

KEYWORDS:

Bitter taste receptor; Kidney; Transgenic mice; α-gustducin

PMID:
25681767
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbrc.2015.01.089
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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