Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Alzheimers Dement. 2015 Sep;11(9):1007-14. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2014.11.009. Epub 2015 Feb 11.

MIND diet associated with reduced incidence of Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine and the Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address: martha_c_morris@rush.edu.
2
Department of Clinical Nutrition and the Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.
3
Department of Internal Medicine and the Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.
4
Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Behavioral Sciences and the Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; Department of Neurology and the Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

In a previous study, higher concordance to the MIND diet, a hybrid Mediterranean-Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet, was associated with slower cognitive decline. In this study we related these three dietary patterns to incident Alzheimer's disease (AD).

METHODS:

We investigated the diet-AD relations in a prospective study of 923 participants, ages 58 to 98 years, followed on average 4.5 years. Diet was assessed by a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire.

RESULTS:

In adjusted proportional hazards models, the second (hazards ratio or HR = 0.65, 95% confidence interval or CI 0.44, 0.98) and highest tertiles (HR = 0.47, 95% CI 0.26, 0.76) of MIND diet scores had lower rates of AD versus tertile 1, whereas only the third tertiles of the DASH (HR = 0.61, 95% CI 0.38, 0.97) and Mediterranean (HR = 0.46, 95% CI 0.26, 0.79) diets were associated with lower AD rates.

DISCUSSION:

High adherence to all three diets may reduce AD risk. Moderate adherence to the MIND diet may also decrease AD risk.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Alzheimer's disease; Cognition; Epidemiological study; Nutrition; diet

PMID:
25681666
PMCID:
PMC4532650
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2014.11.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center