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Vaccine. 2015 Mar 30;33(14):1726-30. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.01.082. Epub 2015 Feb 11.

Impact of high coverage of monovalent human rotavirus vaccine on Emergency Department presentations for rotavirus gastroenteritis.

Author information

1
Centre for Epidemiology and Evidence, NSW Ministry of Health, North Sydney, NSW 2060, Australia.
2
Centre for Epidemiology and Evidence, NSW Ministry of Health, Locked Mail Bag 961, North Sydney, NSW 2059 Australia. Electronic address: dmusc@doh.health.nsw.gov.au.
3
School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.
4
The Telethon Kids Institute, Subiaco, 6008 WA, Australia.
5
School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia; Public Health Unit, South Eastern Sydney Local Health District, Randwick, NSW 2031, Australia.
6
National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance (NCIRS), Westmead, NSW 2145, Australia; Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Australia was one of the first countries to introduce nationally funded rotavirus vaccination. The program has had a substantial impact on both rotavirus and all-cause acute gastroenteritis (AGE) hospitalisations and rotavirus laboratory tests. Evidence for an impact on Emergency Department (ED) presentations is limited. This study assessed changes in ED presentations for rotavirus in children aged <5 years in New South Wales, Australia, following introduction of monovalent human rotavirus vaccine (RV1, Rotarix(®), GlaxoSmithKline Australia Pty Ltd., Victoria, Australia).

METHOD:

A time series analysis to examine trends in total non-admitted ED presentations for all-cause AGE and in the rotavirus-attributable fraction using data on rotavirus positive laboratory tests.

RESULTS:

A decline in the rate of non-admitted ED presentations for all-cause AGE was observed for all ages, being most notable in 1 year old children. Compared with the pre-vaccination period, we estimated the average weekly rate was lower across the first 4.5 years of the program for both all-cause AGE (18.3%; 70.5 versus 57.5 per 100,000 population) and rotavirus attributable (55.4%; 17.3 versus 7.7 per 100,000 population) presentations. In the fourth year of the program, estimated annual rotavirus attributable presentations were 77% lower than the pre-vaccination annual mean (996 versus 4300 per year).

CONCLUSION:

The program was associated with a substantial decline in rotavirus attributable non-admitted AGE presentations to ED among children aged <5 years.

KEYWORDS:

Children; Emergency Department; Gastroenteritis; Rotavirus; Vaccination

PMID:
25681665
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.01.082
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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