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Dig Dis Sci. 2015 Jul;60(7):2058-62. doi: 10.1007/s10620-015-3569-0. Epub 2015 Feb 14.

Medical Prevention of Barrett's Esophagus: Effects of Statins, Aspirin, Non-aspirin NSAIDs, Calcium, and Multivitamins.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology, Carl T. Hayden VA Medical Center, 650 E Indian School Rd, Phoenix, AZ, 85012, USA, aaron.goldberg2@va.gov.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) that is a precursor to esophageal adenocarcinoma. There is limited information regarding whether medications can reduce the risk of developing BE.

AIM:

We analyzed medical records at a large veterans hospital to determine the effects of statins, aspirin, non-aspirin NSAIDs, calcium, or multivitamins on the risk of developing BE.

METHODS:

In this retrospective case-control study, 250 patients with biopsy-confirmed Barrett's esophagus were compared with 250 controls with acid-peptic symptoms but no endoscopic BE. Medication histories were reviewed for the use of the above substances prior to endoscopic evaluation. Logistic and linear regression was used to determine predictors of the outcomes.

RESULTS:

Mean age at diagnosis was significantly older in the Barrett's population compared with controls (61.2 vs. 56.7 years, P < 0.001), with no difference in mean BMI (29.1 vs. 29.0, respectively). On multivariate analysis, independently significant factors for risk of BE were found with multivitamins (OR 0.41, P = 0.001), statins (OR 0.53, P = 0.003), age (OR 1.033/year, P = 0.001), and Hispanic ethnicity (OR 0.38, P = 0.007). Furthermore, statin use was associated with less long-segment (3 cm or longer) BE and was inversely correlated with continuous BE length.

CONCLUSIONS:

GERD patients with BE are less likely to use multivitamins and statins, as well as less likely to be of Hispanic ethnicity. Additionally, statins were inversely associated with BE length. Prospective studies of this topic are indicated.

PMID:
25680872
DOI:
10.1007/s10620-015-3569-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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