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Clin Perinatol. 2015 Mar;42(1):105-17, viii-ix. doi: 10.1016/j.clp.2014.10.008. Epub 2014 Nov 28.

The epidemiology and diagnosis of invasive candidiasis among premature infants.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Duke University, Box 3499, Durham, NC 27710, USA; Duke Clinical Research Institute, PO Box 17969, Durham, NC 27705, USA.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Duke University, Box 3499, Durham, NC 27710, USA; Duke Clinical Research Institute, PO Box 17969, Durham, NC 27705, USA. Electronic address: danny.benjamin@duke.edu.

Abstract

Invasive candidiasis is a leading infectious cause of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. Improved recognition of modifiable risk factors and antifungal prophylaxis has contributed to the recent decline in the incidence of this infection among infants. Invasive candidiasis typically occurs in the first 6 weeks of life and presents with nonspecific signs of sepsis. Definitive diagnosis relies on the growth of Candida in blood culture or cultures from other normally sterile sites, but this may identify fewer than half of cases. Improved diagnostics are needed to guide the initiation of antifungal therapy in premature infants.

KEYWORDS:

Candida; Neonatal candidiasis; Premature infants; Risk factors

PMID:
25677999
PMCID:
PMC4328135
DOI:
10.1016/j.clp.2014.10.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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