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Nat Rev Immunol. 2015 Mar;15(3):149-59. doi: 10.1038/nri3802. Epub 2015 Feb 13.

Memory B cells.

Author information

1
1] Laboratory of Lymphocyte Differentiation, World Premier International Immunology Frontier Research Center and Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. [2] Laboratory for Lymphocyte Differentiation, RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan.
2
1] Laboratory for Lymphocyte Differentiation, RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 230-0045, Japan. [2] Department of Cellular and Molecular Immunology, Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics, Freiburg 79108, Germany.
3
Laboratory of Lymphocyte Differentiation, World Premier International Immunology Frontier Research Center and Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.

Abstract

The immune system can remember a previously experienced pathogen and can evoke an enhanced response to reinfection that depends on memory lymphocyte populations. Recent advances in tracking antigen-experienced memory B cells have revealed the existence of distinct classes of cells that have considerable functional differences. Some of these differences seem to be determined by the stimulation history during memory cell formation. To induce rapid recall antibody responses, the contributions of other types of cells, such as memory T follicular helper cells, have also now begun to be appreciated. In this Review, we discuss these and other recent advances in our understanding of memory B cells, focusing on the underlying mechanisms that are required for rapid and effective recall antibody responses.

PMID:
25677494
DOI:
10.1038/nri3802
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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