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Mol Nutr Food Res. 2015 May;59(5):968-78. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.201400840. Epub 2015 Mar 20.

Diet-induced obesity causes metabolic impairment independent of alterations in gut barrier integrity.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Nutritional Medicine, ZIEL - Research Center for Nutrition and Food Sciences, Technische Universität München, Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany.

Abstract

SCOPE:

The causal relationship between diet-induced obesity and metabolic disorders is not clear yet. One hypothesis is whether the obese state or high-fat diet per se affects intestinal barrier function provoking metabolic comorbidities.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

In three independent experiments with AKR/J, SWR/J, or BL/6J mice, we addressed the impact of genetic background, excess body fat storage, duration of high-fat feeding, and quality/quantity of dietary fat on glucose tolerance and gut barrier integrity in vivo and ex vivo. Impaired glucose tolerance in diet-induced obese BL/6J and AKR/J mice was not accompanied by an altered intestinal barrier function. Enforced dietary challenge by prolonged feeding and increasing fat quantity in BL/6J mice still failed to aggravate metabolic and intestinal deterioration. Despite a low-grade inflammatory status in adipose tissue, barrier function of BL/6J mice fed lard high-fat diet revealed no evidence for a diet-induced loss in barrier integrity.

CONCLUSION:

None of our results provided any evidence that gut barrier function is a subject to dietary regulation and obesity per se seems not to cause gut barrier impairment.

KEYWORDS:

Diet-induced obesity; Glucose tolerance; Gut barrier integrity; High-fat diet; Mouse strains

PMID:
25676872
DOI:
10.1002/mnfr.201400840
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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