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J Neurosci. 2015 Feb 11;35(6):2372-83. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0969-14.2015.

Loss of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 from parvalbumin interneurons leads to hyperinhibition, decreased anxiety, and memory impairment.

Author information

1
Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139.
2
Department of Cell Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.
3
Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, Broad Institute, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, and lhtsai@mit.edu.

Abstract

Perturbations in fast-spiking parvalbumin (PV) interneurons are hypothesized to be a major component of various neuropsychiatric disorders; however, the mechanisms regulating PV interneurons remain mostly unknown. Recently, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been shown to function as a major regulator of synaptic plasticity. Here, we demonstrate that genetic ablation of Cdk5 in PV interneurons in mouse brain leads to an increase in GABAergic neurotransmission and impaired synaptic plasticity. PVCre;fCdk5 mice display a range of behavioral abnormalities, including decreased anxiety and memory impairment. Our results reveal a central role of Cdk5 expressed in PV interneurons in gating inhibitory neurotransmission and underscore the importance of such regulation during behavioral tasks. Our findings suggest that Cdk5 can be considered a promising therapeutic target in a variety of conditions attributed to inhibitory interneuronal dysfunction, such as epilepsy, anxiety disorders, and schizophrenia.

KEYWORDS:

anxiety; axon initial segment; cognition; cyclin-dependent kinase 5; fast-spiking (FS) parvalbumin (PV)-interneurons

PMID:
25673832
PMCID:
PMC4323522
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0969-14.2015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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