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Nature. 2015 Feb 12;518(7538):179-86. doi: 10.1038/nature14165.

From quantum matter to high-temperature superconductivity in copper oxides.

Author information

1
Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart, Germany.
2
Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.
3
Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA.
4
Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.
5
Lorentz Institute for Theoretical Physics, Universiteit Leiden, PO Box 9506, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands.

Abstract

The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in the copper oxides in 1986 triggered a huge amount of innovative scientific inquiry. In the almost three decades since, much has been learned about the novel forms of quantum matter that are exhibited in these strongly correlated electron systems. A qualitative understanding of the nature of the superconducting state itself has been achieved. However, unresolved issues include the astonishing complexity of the phase diagram, the unprecedented prominence of various forms of collective fluctuations, and the simplicity and insensitivity to material details of the 'normal' state at elevated temperatures.

PMID:
25673411
DOI:
10.1038/nature14165

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