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Sci Rep. 2015 Feb 12;5:8427. doi: 10.1038/srep08427.

Anchoring dipalmitoyl phosphoethanolamine to nanoparticles boosts cellular uptake and fluorine-19 magnetic resonance signal.

Author information

1
Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility, Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany.
2
Leibniz-Institut für Molekulare Pharmakologie, Berlin, Germany.
3
Electron Microscopy Core Facility, Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany.
4
1] Berlin Ultrahigh Field Facility, Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany [2] Experimental and Clinical Research Center, Berlin, Germany.
5
MRI TOOLs GmbH, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

Magnetic resonance (MR) methods to detect and quantify fluorine ((19)F) nuclei provide the opportunity to study the fate of cellular transplants in vivo. Cells are typically labeled with (19)F nanoparticles, introduced into living organisms and tracked by (19)F MR methods. Background-free imaging and quantification of cell numbers are amongst the strengths of (19)F MR-based cell tracking but challenges pertaining to signal sensitivity and cell detection exist. In this study we aimed to overcome these limitations by manipulating the aminophospholipid composition of (19)F nanoparticles in order to promote their uptake by dendritic cells (DCs). As critical components of biological membranes, phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) were studied. Both microscopy and MR spectroscopy methods revealed a striking (at least one order of magnitude) increase in cytoplasmic uptake of (19)F nanoparticles in DCs following enrichment with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE). The impact of enriching (19)F nanoparticles with PE on DC migration was also investigated. By manipulating the nanoparticle composition and as a result the cellular uptake we provide here one way of boosting (19)F signal per cell in order to overcome some of the limitations related to (19)F MR signal sensitivity. The boost in signal is ultimately necessary to detect and track cells in vivo.

PMID:
25673047
PMCID:
PMC5389132
DOI:
10.1038/srep08427
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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