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J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2016 Jan;87(1):86-92. doi: 10.1136/jnnp-2014-310065. Epub 2015 Feb 10.

Dietary cholesterol, fats and risk of Parkinson's disease in the Singapore Chinese Health Study.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, National Neuroscience Institute, Singapore, Singapore Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.
2
Department of Neurology, National Neuroscience Institute, Singapore, Singapore.
3
Department of Medicine, National University Health System, Singapore, Singapore.
4
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
5
Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore, Singapore, Singapore Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Prospective studies on lipids and risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in Asian populations are sparse. This study prospectively examined the associations between dietary cholesterol and major fatty acids, and risk of PD among the Chinese in Singapore.

METHODS:

This study used data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a population-based prospective cohort of 63 257 men and women aged 45-74 years in Singapore enrolled in 1993-1998. Dietary intakes of cholesterol and fatty acids were derived from a validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire and the Singapore Food Composition Table. Incident PD cases were identified either through follow-up interviews or record linkage analysis with hospital discharge and PD outpatient registries.

RESULTS:

After an average of 14.6 years, 218 men and 193 women in the cohort developed PD. Dietary cholesterol was associated with statistically significantly lower risk of PD in a dose-dependent manner among men after adjustment for established risk factors for PD and intakes of major fatty acids. Compared to the lowest quartile, HR (95% CI) for the highest quartile was 0.53 (95% CI 0.33 to 0.84) (P for trend=0.006). Among women, dietary monounsaturated fatty acid was inversely associated with PD risk (P for trend=0.033). Compared to the lowest quartile, HR for the highest quartile was 0.44 (95% CI 0.22 to 0.88). There was no statistically significant association between dietary saturated, n-3 and n-6 fatty acids and PD risk.

CONCLUSIONS:

Higher intakes of cholesterol and monounsaturated fatty acids may reduce risk of PD in men and women, respectively.

KEYWORDS:

CHOLESTEROL; EPIDEMIOLOGY; PARKINSON'S DISEASE

PMID:
25669745
PMCID:
PMC4929981
DOI:
10.1136/jnnp-2014-310065
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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