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Cardiol Young. 2016 Feb;26(2):244-9. doi: 10.1017/S1047951115000050. Epub 2015 Feb 10.

Breakfast frequency, adiposity, and cardiovascular risk factors as markers in adolescents.

Author information

1
1Post-Graduate Program in Movement Sciences,Sao Paulo State University - UNESP,Rio Claro,Brazil.
2
4Program of Post-Graduate in Radiology,Federal University of Sao Paulo - UNIFESP,Brazil.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To analyse the relationship between skipping breakfast and haemodynamic, metabolic, inflammatory, and cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study was carried out with information from an ongoing cohort study in Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, Brazil. The sample comprised of 120 adolescents (11.7±0.8 years old) who met the following inclusion criteria: age between 11 and 14 years; enrolled in the school unit of elementary education; absence of any known disease; and no drug consumption. The parents or legal guardians of the patients signed a formal informed consent. Skipping breakfast was self-reported through face-to-face interviews. Blood pressure, intima-media thickness, trunk fatness, total and fractional cholesterol levels - high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol - triacylglycerol levels, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels were measured.

RESULTS:

In this study, 47.5% (95% CI: 38.5-56.4%) of the adolescents reported skipping breakfast at least 1 day/week. Adolescents who skipped breakfast had higher values of trunk fatness and systolic blood pressure. Breakfast frequency was negatively related to systolic blood pressure (β -1.99 [-3.67; -0.31]) and z score dyslipidaemia (β -0.46 [-0.90; -0.01]), but this relationship was mediated by trunk fatness.

CONCLUSION:

Skipping breakfast is related to cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents, and this relationship was mainly mediated by trunk fatness.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; cardiovascular risk factors; skipping breakfast

PMID:
25668394
DOI:
10.1017/S1047951115000050
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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