Format

Send to

Choose Destination
PLoS Comput Biol. 2015 Feb 10;11(2):e1004048. doi: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004048. eCollection 2015 Feb.

Developing a molecular roadmap of drug-food interactions.

Author information

1
Department of Systems Biology, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, Denmark.
2
School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong.

Abstract

Recent research has demonstrated that consumption of food -especially fruits and vegetables- can alter the effects of drugs by interfering either with their pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic processes. Despite the recognition of such drug-food associations as an important element for successful therapeutic interventions, a systematic approach for identifying, predicting and preventing potential interactions between food and marketed or novel drugs is not yet available. The overall objective of this work was to sketch a comprehensive picture of the interference of ∼ 4,000 dietary components present in ∼1800 plant-based foods with the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics processes of medicine, with the purpose of elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved. By employing a systems chemical biology approach that integrates data from the scientific literature and online databases, we gained a global view of the associations between diet and dietary molecules with drug targets, metabolic enzymes, drug transporters and carriers currently deposited in DrugBank. Moreover, we identified disease areas and drug targets that are most prone to the negative effects of drug-food interactions, showcasing a platform for making recommendations in relation to foods that should be avoided under certain medications. Lastly, by investigating the correlation of gene expression signatures of foods and drugs we were able to generate a completely novel drug-diet interactome map.

PMID:
25668218
PMCID:
PMC4323218
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004048
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Public Library of Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center