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Food Chem Toxicol. 2015 Apr;78:214-20. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2015.01.011. Epub 2015 Feb 7.

An approach to the identification and regulation of endocrine disrupting pesticides.

Author information

1
WRc, National Centre for Environmental Toxicology, Frankland Road, Swindon, Wiltshire SN5 8YF UK. Electronic address: annette.ewence@wrcplc.co.uk.
2
Chemical Regulations Directorate, Health and Safety Executive, Redgrave Court, Bootle, UK.
3
WRc, National Centre for Environmental Toxicology, Frankland Road, Swindon, Wiltshire SN5 8YF UK.

Abstract

Recent decades have seen an increasing interest in chemicals that interact with the endocrine system and have the potential to alter the normal function of this system in humans and wildlife. Chemicals that produce adverse effects caused by interaction with endocrine systems are termed Endocrine Disrupters (EDs). This interest has led regulatory authorities around the world (including the European Union) to consider whether potential endocrine disrupters should be identified and assessed for effects on human health and wildlife and what harmonised criteria could be used for such an assessment. This paper reviews the results of a study whereby toxicity data relating to human health effects of 98 pesticides were assessed for endocrine disruption potential using a number of criteria including the Specific Target Organ Toxicity for repeat exposure (STOT-RE) guidance values used in the European Classification, Labelling and Packaging (CLP) Regulation. Of the pesticides assessed, 27% required further information in order to make a more definitive assessment, 14% were considered to be endocrine disrupters, more or less likely to pose a risk, and 59% were considered not to be endocrine disrupters.

KEYWORDS:

Endocrine disruption; Hazard assessment; Pesticides; Regulation; Risk assessment

PMID:
25666658
DOI:
10.1016/j.fct.2015.01.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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