Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Molecules. 2015 Feb 5;20(2):2728-69. doi: 10.3390/molecules20022728.

The multifaceted role of curcumin in cancer prevention and treatment.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597, Singapore. phcsmk@nus.edu.sg.
2
Department of Pharmacology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597, Singapore. a0095676@nus.edu.sg.
3
Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, Centre for Translational Medicine, 14 Medical Drive, #11-01M, Singapore 117599, Singapore. a0095676@nus.edu.sg.
4
Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, Centre for Translational Medicine, 14 Medical Drive, #11-01M, Singapore 117599, Singapore. csikmm@nus.edu.sg.
5
School of Biomedical Sciences, CHIRI Biosciences Research Precinct, Curtin University, Western Australia 6009, Australia. frank.arfuso@uwa.edu.au.
6
Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. dr.arunmicro@gmail.com.
7
Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. mozayed@ksu.edu.sa.
8
Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. sharbi@ksu.edu.sa.
9
Department of Pharmacology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597, Singapore. benny_tan@nuhs.edu.sg.
10
Department of Pharmacology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597, Singapore. csiapk@nus.edu.sg.
11
Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, Centre for Translational Medicine, 14 Medical Drive, #11-01M, Singapore 117599, Singapore. csiapk@nus.edu.sg.
12
School of Biomedical Sciences, CHIRI Biosciences Research Precinct, Curtin University, Western Australia 6009, Australia. csiapk@nus.edu.sg.
13
Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA. csiapk@nus.edu.sg.
14
Department of Pharmacology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117597, Singapore. phcgs@nus.edu.sg.
15
School of Biomedical Sciences, CHIRI Biosciences Research Precinct, Curtin University, Western Australia 6009, Australia. phcgs@nus.edu.sg.
16
Department of Botany and Microbiology, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. phcgs@nus.edu.sg.

Abstract

Despite significant advances in treatment modalities over the last decade, neither the incidence of the disease nor the mortality due to cancer has altered in the last thirty years. Available anti-cancer drugs exhibit limited efficacy, associated with severe side effects, and are also expensive. Thus identification of pharmacological agents that do not have these disadvantages is required. Curcumin, a polyphenolic compound derived from turmeric (Curcumin longa), is one such agent that has been extensively studied over the last three to four decades for its potential anti-inflammatory and/or anti-cancer effects. Curcumin has been found to suppress initiation, progression, and metastasis of a variety of tumors. These anti-cancer effects are predominantly mediated through its negative regulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, inflammatory cytokines, protein kinases, and other oncogenic molecules. It also abrogates proliferation of cancer cells by arresting them at different phases of the cell cycle and/or by inducing their apoptosis. The current review focuses on the diverse molecular targets modulated by curcumin that contribute to its efficacy against various human cancers.

PMID:
25665066
DOI:
10.3390/molecules20022728
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI)
Loading ...
Support Center