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Muscle Nerve. 2015 Nov;52(5):844-51. doi: 10.1002/mus.24598. Epub 2015 Sep 3.

Effects of neuromuscular fatigue on electromechanical delay of the leg extensors and flexors in young men and women.

Author information

1
Department of Wellness, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA.
2
Applied Musculoskeletal and Human Physiology Laboratory, Department of Health and Human Performance, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA.
3
School of Health Sciences, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, USA.
4
Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, 79409, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

We examined the effects of neuromuscular fatigue on volitional electromechanical delay (EMD) of leg extensors and flexors between genders.

METHODS:

Twenty-one men and 20 women performed 2 maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), followed by intermittent isometric contractions of leg extensors and flexors using a 0.6 duty cycle (6-s contraction, 4-s relaxation) at 50% of MVC until volitional fatigue was achieved. MVCs were again performed at 0, 7, 15, and 30 min post-fatigue.

RESULTS:

EMD was greater compared with baseline at all post-fatigue time phases for the leg flexors (P = 0.001-0.007), while EMD was greater at Post0, Post15 and Post30 (P = 0.001-0.023) for the leg extensors. EMD was also greater for leg extensors compared with leg flexors only at Post0.

CONCLUSION:

No differential gender-related fatigue effects on EMD were shown. There were different fatigue-induced responses between leg extensors and flexors, with leg extensors exhibiting higher EMD immediately post-fatigue.

KEYWORDS:

gender; hamstrings; neuromuscular fatigue; quadriceps; recovery

PMID:
25664987
DOI:
10.1002/mus.24598
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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