Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Neurosci. 2015 Mar;18(3):386-92. doi: 10.1038/nn.3945. Epub 2015 Feb 9.

Dopaminergic and glutamatergic microdomains in a subset of rodent mesoaccumbens axons.

Author information

1
National Institute on Drug Abuse, Neuronal Networks Section, US National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
2
National Institute on Drug Abuse, Synaptic Plasticity Section, US National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
3
National Institute on Drug Abuse, Electrophysiology Research Section, US National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Abstract

Mesoaccumbens fibers are thought to co-release dopamine and glutamate. However, the mechanism is unclear, and co-release by mesoaccumbens fibers has not been documented. Using electron microcopy, we found that some mesoaccumbens fibers have vesicular transporters for dopamine (VMAT2) in axon segments that are continuous with axon terminals that lack VMAT2, but contain vesicular glutamate transporters type 2 (VGluT2). In vivo overexpression of VMAT2 did not change the segregation of the two vesicular types, suggesting the existence of highly regulated mechanisms for maintaining this segregation. The mesoaccumbens axon terminals containing VGluT2 vesicles make asymmetric synapses, commonly associated with excitatory signaling. Using optogenetics, we found that dopamine and glutamate were released from the same mesoaccumbens fibers. These findings reveal a complex type of signaling by mesoaccumbens fibers in which dopamine and glutamate can be released from the same axons, but are not normally released at the same site or from the same synaptic vesicles.

PMID:
25664911
PMCID:
PMC4340758
DOI:
10.1038/nn.3945
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center