Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Int J Med Biomed Sci. 2014 Feb;2(1):6-19.

Predictors of non-response and non-compliance in African American lupus patients: Findings from the Balancing Lupus Experiences with Stress Strategies (BLESS) Study.

Author information

1
Institute for Partnerships to Eliminate Health Disparities, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 220 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 103, Columbia, SC 29210, (803) 251-2225, (803) 251-6327.
2
Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, 800 Sumter Street, Suite 205, Columbia, SC 29208.
3
Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Suite 816, Charleston, SC 29425.
4
Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, Suite 816, Charleston, SC 29425 and Medical Service, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC.

Abstract

Arthritis self-management education has demonstrated significant improvements in health distress, self-reported global health, and activity limitation, with trends toward improvement in self efficacy and mental stress management. Consequently, numerous national agencies have recommended arthritis self-management education to complement medical care. Despite these recommendations, arthritis self-management education has reached only a limited number of people. Compliance is also a persistent problem in standardized programs. As part of the Balancing Lupus Experiences with Stress Strategies (BLESS) Study, a validated psychosocial stress intervention was piloted among a cohort of African American lupus patients participating in an SLE database project at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). Recruitment attempts were made with the 330 database participants who met eligibility requirements for the study. While enrollment was limited to 30 participants (n=15 controls and n=15 intervention), two of the participants assigned to the intervention group did not attend any intervention sessions and several participants did not complete post-intervention questionnaires. Therefore, data were analyzed on 30 participants at baseline, 25 (n=13 controls and n=12 intervention) at post-intervention, and 22 (n=12 controls and n=10 intervention) at four months post-intervention. In an effort to characterize those who fully participated in the study and those who were non-compliant or non-responsive to recruitment attempts, we obtained descriptive data from African-American Lupus patients participating in the SLE Clinic Database Project. This information can be used to develop and refine future intervention activities.

PMID:
25664344
PMCID:
PMC4319671

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center