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J Arthroplasty. 2015 May;30(5):870-4. doi: 10.1016/j.arth.2014.12.021. Epub 2015 Jan 10.

Patient-specific computer model of dynamic squatting after total knee arthroplasty.

Author information

1
Shiley Center for Orthopaedic Research and Education at Scripps Clinic, Scripps Health, La Jolla, California; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan.
2
Shiley Center for Orthopaedic Research and Education at Scripps Clinic, Scripps Health, La Jolla, California.
3
Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.
4
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Abstract

Knee forces are highly relevant to performance after total knee arthroplasty especially during high flexion activities such as squatting. We constructed subject-specific models of two patients implanted with instrumented knee prostheses that measured knee forces in vivo. In vivo peak forces ranged from 2.2 to 2.3 times bodyweight but peaked at different flexion angles based on the type of squatting activity. Our model predicted tibiofemoral contact force with reasonable accuracy in both subjects. This model can be a very useful tool to predict the effect of surgical techniques and component alignment on contact forces. In addition, this model could be used for implant design development, to enhance knee function, to predict forces generated during other activities, and for predicting clinical outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

computer model; knee contact force; patient-specific; squatting; total knee arthroplasty

PMID:
25662671
PMCID:
PMC4426034
DOI:
10.1016/j.arth.2014.12.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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