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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2015 Feb;135(2):312-23. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2014.12.1908.

The future of biologics: applications for food allergy.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Immunology, Allergy, and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Ill.
3
Division of Pediatric Immunology, Allergy, and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif. Electronic address: knadeau@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Allergic diseases affect millions worldwide, with growing evidence of an increase in allergy occurrence over the past few decades. Current treatments for allergy include corticosteroids to reduce inflammation and allergen immunotherapy; however, some subjects experience treatment-resistant inflammation or adverse reactions to these treatments, and there are currently no approved therapeutics for the treatment of food allergy. There is a dire need for new therapeutic approaches for patients with poorly controlled atopic diseases and a need to improve the safety and effectiveness of allergen immunotherapy. Improved understanding of allergy through animal models and clinical trials has unveiled potential targets for new therapies, leading to the development of several biologics to treat allergic diseases. This review focuses on the mechanisms that contribute to allergy, with an emphasis on future targets for biologics for the treatment of food allergy. These biologics include immunotherapy with novel anti-IgE antibodies and analogs, small-molecule inhibitors of cell signaling, anti-type 2 cytokine mAbs, and TH1-promoting adjuvants.

KEYWORDS:

Food allergy; allergen sensitization; anaphylaxis; anti-IgE; biologics; immunotherapy; oral tolerance

PMID:
25662303
PMCID:
PMC5108659
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2014.12.1908
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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