Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Neuron. 2015 Feb 18;85(4):847-60. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2015.01.006. Epub 2015 Feb 5.

Spatial patterns of persistent neural activity vary with the behavioral context of short-term memory.

Author information

  • 1Institute for Computational Biomedicine and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA; Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.
  • 2Center for Neuroscience, Department of Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior, and Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95618, USA. Electronic address: msgoldman@ucdavis.edu.
  • 3Institute for Computational Biomedicine and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA. Electronic address: ema2004@med.cornell.edu.

Abstract

A short-term memory can be evoked by different inputs and control separate targets in different behavioral contexts. To address the circuit mechanisms underlying context-dependent memory function, we determined through optical imaging how memory is encoded at the whole-network level in two behavioral settings. Persistent neural activity maintaining a memory of desired eye position was imaged throughout the oculomotor integrator after saccadic or optokinetic stimulation. While eye position was encoded by the amplitude of network activity, the spatial patterns of firing were context dependent: cells located caudally generally were most persistent following saccadic input, whereas cells located rostrally were most persistent following optokinetic input. To explain these data, we computationally identified four independent modes of network activity and found these were differentially accessed by saccadic and optokinetic inputs. These results show how a circuit can simultaneously encode memory value and behavioral context, respectively, in its amplitude and spatial pattern of persistent firing.

PMID:
25661184
PMCID:
PMC4336549
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2015.01.006
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center