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Neuron. 2015 Feb 18;85(4):710-7. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2015.01.001. Epub 2015 Feb 5.

A critical period for experience-dependent remodeling of adult-born neuron connectivity.

Author information

1
Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Aging-Associated Diseases (CECAD) and University Hospital of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany; Physiological Genomics, Institute of Physiology, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, 80336 Munich, Germany. Electronic address: matteo.bergami@uk-koeln.de.
2
Physiological Genomics, Institute of Physiology, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, 80336 Munich, Germany; Institute of Stem Cell Research, Helmholtz Zentrum München, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany.
3
Laboratory of Neuronal Plasticity, Leloir Institute (IIBBA, CONICET), C1405BWE Buenos Aires, Argentina.
4
Department of Mitochondrial Biology, Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, 50931 Cologne, Germany.
5
Cologne Excellence Cluster on Cellular Stress Responses in Aging-Associated Diseases (CECAD) and University Hospital of Cologne, 50931 Cologne, Germany.
6
Max von Pettenkofer Institute and Gene Center, Ludwig Maximilians-University Munich, 81377 Munich, Germany.
7
Physiological Genomics, Institute of Physiology, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, 80336 Munich, Germany; Institute of Stem Cell Research, Helmholtz Zentrum München, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany; Munich Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy), 80336 Munich, Germany.
8
Physiological Genomics, Institute of Physiology, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, 80336 Munich, Germany; Institute of Physiological Chemistry, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, 55128 Mainz, Germany; Focus Program Translational Neuroscience, Johannes Gutenberg University, 55131 Mainz, Germany.

Abstract

Neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the adult hippocampus is a process regulated by experience. To understand whether experience also modifies the connectivity of new neurons, we systematically investigated changes in their innervation following environmental enrichment (EE). We found that EE exposure between 2-6 weeks following neuron birth, rather than merely increasing the number of new neurons, profoundly affected their pattern of monosynaptic inputs. Both local innervation by interneurons and to even greater degree long-distance innervation by cortical neurons were markedly enhanced. Furthermore, following EE, new neurons received inputs from CA3 and CA1 inhibitory neurons that were rarely observed under control conditions. While EE-induced changes in inhibitory innervation were largely transient, cortical innervation remained increased after returning animals to control conditions. Our findings demonstrate an unprecedented experience-dependent reorganization of connections impinging onto adult-born neurons, which is likely to have important impact on their contribution to hippocampal information processing.

PMID:
25661179
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2015.01.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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