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Vaccine. 2015 Mar 30;33(14):1748-55. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.01.068. Epub 2015 Feb 7.

Vaccine hesitancy among parents of adolescents and its association with vaccine uptake.

Author information

1
Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Pediatrics, 135 Rutledge Ave, MSC 561, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. Electronic address: robertsj@musc.edu.
2
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Department of Pediatrics, Section of General and Community Pediatrics, 1200 Children's Avenue, OUCPB Suite 12400, Oklahoma City, OK 73104, USA.
3
Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Desk Ba3b, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905-0001, USA.
4
Seattle Children's Research Institute, JMB-6 Clinical and Translational Research, 1900 9th Ave, Seattle, WA 98101, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Addressing parental vaccine hesitancy may increase adolescent vaccination acceptance. However, no validated measure exists to identify parents hesitant toward adolescent vaccines.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if a modified version of the Parent Attitudes about Childhood Vaccines (PACV) survey, a previously validated tool to identify parental hesitancy toward vaccines in infants, predicts adolescent vaccine uptake at office visits.

METHODS:

We modified the PACV for use in the adolescent setting and distributed it to a convenience sample of parents of adolescents aged 11 to 17 presenting for care at a diverse group of six pediatric practices in Oklahoma and South Carolina. We determined the vaccination status of the parents' adolescents for 3 vaccines (Tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis [Tdap], meningococcal conjugate [MCV4], and human papillomavirus [HPV] vaccines). We used Fisher's exact tests to compare vaccination status with each survey item and with an overall general hesitancy scale that we constructed.

RESULTS:

We analyzed 363 surveys. At the time of the visit, vaccination coverage was 84% for Tdap, 73% for MCV, and 45% for any dose of HPV. Thirty-nine percent of parents expressed concern about vaccine efficacy and 41% expressed concern about side effects. Forty-five percent of parents disagreed with the statement that "teens can get all of the vaccines that are due at a single visit." Two individual items were associated with not receiving a dose of HPV vaccine that was due. The overall modified PACV score failed to predict adolescent vaccine uptake at an office visit.

CONCLUSION:

Several individual items were associated with vaccine uptake. The cumulative modified PACV, a general measure of vaccine hesitancy, was not associated with vaccination status despite illuminating parental hesitancy. We need to better understand vaccine-specific concerns for the adolescent population.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; Hesitancy; Immunization; Parent; Vaccine

PMID:
25659278
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.01.068
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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