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PLoS One. 2015 Feb 6;10(2):e0116547. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0116547. eCollection 2015.

Detection of Japanese encephalitis virus genotype V in Culex orientalis and Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) in Korea.

Author information

1
Division of Medical Entomology, Center for Immunology and Pathology, Korea National Institute of Health, Cheongju, South Korea; Department of Agricultural Biotechnology, Seoul National University, Seoul, South Korea.
2
Division of Arboviruses, Center for Immunology and Pathology, Korea National Institute of Health, Cheongju, South Korea.
3
Division of Arboviruses, Center for Immunology and Pathology, Korea National Institute of Health, Cheongju, South Korea; Department of Biomedical Sciences, Graduate School of Hallym University, Chuncheon, South Korea.
4
Division of Medical Entomology, Center for Immunology and Pathology, Korea National Institute of Health, Cheongju, South Korea.

Abstract

Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) causes significant viral encephalitis and is distributed throughout the Asian countries. The virus is known to be transmitted by Culex tritaeniorhynchus, which mainly breeds in rice paddies in Korea. In this study, we investigated the presence of other mosquito species that can transmit JEV as a second or regional vector. We selected five cities where patients have experienced JE in the last 5 years as mosquito-collecting locations and subdivided them into four collection sites according to the mosquito habitats (cowshed, downtown area, forest, and swamp). Mosquitoes were caught using the BG-Sentinel trap, CDC black-light trap, Fay-Prince trap, and Gravid trap. A total of 993 pools from 22,774 mosquitoes were prepared according to their species, collection date, and site. We performed a SYBR Green 1-based real-time RT-PCR assay to detect JEV from the mosquito pools. A total of six JEV-positive pools were detected from Culex orientalis and Culex pipiens caught in the Gangwon-do and Gyeonngi-do provinces. All the detected JEVs were revealed as genotype V by phylogenetic analysis of the envelope gene. Our findings confirm that a new genotype of JEV was introduced in Korea and suggest that two mosquito species may play a role in JEV transmission.

PMID:
25658839
PMCID:
PMC4319795
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0116547
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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