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Clin Microbiol Infect. 2015 Feb;21(2):150-6. doi: 10.1016/j.cmi.2014.07.014. Epub 2014 Oct 12.

Increase in isolation of Burkholderia contaminans from Spanish patients with cystic fibrosis.

Author information

1
Laboratorio de Taxonomía, Servicio de Bacteriología, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: mjmedina@isciii.es.
2
Laboratorio de Taxonomía, Servicio de Bacteriología, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

Species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex are associated with opportunistic infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. For years now, B. multivorans and B. cenocepacia have been the most frequently isolated species within the complex in such patients. However, between 2008 and 2012, the overall incidence of these species in Spain (17.7% and 12.5% respectively) was overtaken by that of B. contaminans (36.5%). The population structure of B. contaminans isolates from Spanish patients with cystic fibrosis was analysed using multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Three major known sequence types (ST102, ST404 and ST482) and a new one (ST771) were identified among 59 isolates. In addition, PFGE detected 17 pulsotypes. Susceptibility to antibiotics was examined using the Etest. Cotrimoxazole and ceftazidime were the most active antibiotics against B. contaminans, inhibiting growth in 88% and 86% of the isolates, respectively. In addition, this species showed less resistance to most of the antibiotics tested than did either B. multivorans or B. cenocepacia isolates recovered from similar Spanish patients.

KEYWORDS:

Antimicrobial susceptibility; Burkholderia contaminans, cystic fibrosis; genetic diversity; multilocus sequence typing; pulsed field gel electrophoresis

PMID:
25658563
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmi.2014.07.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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