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Neural Regen Res. 2012 Jun 25;7(18):1413-9. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1673-5374.2012.18.008.

L-tyrosine improves neuroendocrine function in a mouse model of chronic stress.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency, Second Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical College, Kunming 650221, Yunnan Province, China.
2
Department of Ophthalmology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical College, Kunming 650221, Yunnan Province, China.
3
Department of Gastrointestinal Diseases, Yan-an Hospital, Kunming 650051, Yunnan Province, China.
4
Second Department of Internal Medicine of Wu-hua District People's Hospital of Kunming, Kunming 650051, Yunnan Province, China.
5
Department of Anatomy, Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650031, Yunnan Province, China.
6
Department of Orthopedics, Second Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming 650101, Yunnan Province, China.

Abstract

Adult BALB/c mice, individually housed, were stimulated with nine different stressors, arranged randomly, for 4 continuous weeks to generate an animal model of chronic stress. In chronically stressed mice, spontaneous locomotor activity was significantly decreased, escape latency in the Morris water maze test was prolonged, serum levels of total thyrotropin and total triiodothyronine were significantly decreased, and dopamine and norepinephrine content in the pallium, hippocampus and hypothalamus were significantly reduced. All of these changes were suppressed, to varying degrees, by L-tyrosine supplementation. These findings indicate that the neuroendocrine network plays an important role in chronic stress, and that L-tyrosine supplementation has therapeutic effects.

KEYWORDS:

L-tyrosine; chronic unpredictable stress; dopamine; neural regeneration; neuroendocrine network; norepinephrine; total thyrotropin; total triiodothyronine

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