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J Neurophysiol. 2015 Apr 1;113(7):2721-32. doi: 10.1152/jn.00955.2014. Epub 2015 Feb 4.

Incorporating 3D-printing technology in the design of head-caps and electrode drives for recording neurons in multiple brain regions.

Author information

1
Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience, Rutgers-Newark, The State University of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey dbh60@andromeda.rutgers.edu.
2
Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience, Rutgers-Newark, The State University of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey.

Abstract

Recent advances in recording and computing hardware have enabled laboratories to record the electrical activity of multiple brain regions simultaneously. Lagging behind these technical advances, however, are the methods needed to rapidly produce microdrives and head-caps that can flexibly accommodate different recording configurations. Indeed, most available designs target single or adjacent brain regions, and, if multiple sites are targeted, specially constructed head-caps are used. Here, we present a novel design style, for both microdrives and head-caps, which takes advantage of three-dimensional printing technology. This design facilitates targeting of multiple brain regions in various configurations. Moreover, the parts are easily fabricated in large quantities, with only minor hand-tooling and finishing required.

KEYWORDS:

extracellular recording; method; microdrive; silicon probe; tetrode

PMID:
25652930
PMCID:
PMC4416572
DOI:
10.1152/jn.00955.2014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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