Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Vis Exp. 2015 Jan 16;(95):52297. doi: 10.3791/52297.

A mouse fetal skin model of scarless wound repair.

Author information

1
Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine; Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine.
2
Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine; Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine; Department of Surgery, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawai'i.
3
Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine; University of Central Florida College of Medicine.
4
Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine.
5
Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine; Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine; longaker@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Early in utero, but not in postnatal life, cutaneous wounds undergo regeneration and heal without formation of a scar. Scarless fetal wound healing occurs across species but is age dependent. The transition from a scarless to scarring phenotype occurs in the third trimester of pregnancy in humans and around embryonic day 18 (E18) in mice. However, this varies with the size of the wound with larger defects generating a scar at an earlier gestational age. The emergence of lineage tracing and other genetic tools in the mouse has opened promising new avenues for investigation of fetal scarless wound healing. However, given the inherently high rates of morbidity and premature uterine contraction associated with fetal surgery, investigations of fetal scarless wound healing in vivo require a precise and reproducible surgical model. Here we detail a reliable model of fetal scarless wound healing in the dorsum of E16.5 (scarless) and E18.5 (scarring) mouse embryos.

PMID:
25650841
PMCID:
PMC4354537
DOI:
10.3791/52297
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for MyJove Corporation Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center