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G3 (Bethesda). 2015 Feb 3;5(4):531-9. doi: 10.1534/g3.114.014811.

Heritable variation in courtship patterns in Drosophila melanogaster.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Sciences, W. M. Keck Center for Behavioral Biology and Program in Genetics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7614.
2
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-2703.
3
Department of Biological Sciences, W. M. Keck Center for Behavioral Biology and Program in Genetics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7614 trudy_mackay@ncsu.edu.

Abstract

Little is known about the genetic basis of naturally occurring variation for sexually selected behavioral traits. Drosophila melanogaster, with its rich repertoire of courtship behavior and genomic and genetic resources, is an excellent model organism for addressing this question. We assayed a genetically diverse panel of lines with full genome sequences, the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, to assess the heritability of variation in courtship behavior and mating progression. We subsequently used these data to quantify natural variation in transition probabilities between courtship behaviors. We found heritable variation along the expected trajectory for courtship behaviors, including the tendency to initiate courtship and rate of progression through courtship, suggesting a genetic basis to male modulation of courtship behavior based on feedback from unrelated, outbred, and genetically identical females. We assessed the genetic basis of variation of the transition with the greatest heritability--from copulation to no engagement with the female--and identified variants in Serrate and Furin 1 as well as many other polymorphisms on the chromosome 3R associated with this transition. Our findings suggest that courtship is a highly dynamic behavior with both social and genetic inputs, and that males may play an important role in courtship initiation and duration.

KEYWORDS:

DGRP; GWAS; behavior; ethogram; quantitative genetics

PMID:
25650358
PMCID:
PMC4390569
DOI:
10.1534/g3.114.014811
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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