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Parasit Vectors. 2015 Feb 4;8:75. doi: 10.1186/s13071-015-0649-0.

Guideline for veterinary practitioners on canine ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis in Europe.

Author information

1
Department of Animal Medicine and Surgery, Veterinary Clinic Hospital, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. angelehr@vet.ucm.es.
2
Hospital Clinic Veterinari, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Xavier.Roura@uab.cat.
3
Department of Animal Health, Veterinary Clinic Hospital, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. gmiro@ucm.es.
4
Department of Animal Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain. aestrada@unizar.es.
5
Small Animal Clinic, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany. Barbara.Kohn@fu-berlin.de.
6
Koret School of Veterinary Medicine, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Rehovot, Israel. shimon.harrus@mail.huji.ac.il.
7
Departament de Medicina i Cirurgia Animal, Facultat de Veterinaria, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain. Laia.Solano@uab.cat.

Abstract

Canine ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis are important tick-borne diseases with a worldwide distribution. Information has been continuously collected on these infections in Europe, and publications have increased in recent years. Prevalence rates are high for Ehrlichia and Anaplasma spp. infections in dogs from different European countries. The goal of this article was to provide a practical guideline for veterinary practitioners on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis in dogs from Europe. This guideline is intended to answer the most common questions on these diseases from a practical point of view.

PMID:
25649069
PMCID:
PMC4324656
DOI:
10.1186/s13071-015-0649-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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